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EZ Vane Inc. has been in business 16 years. We are located in Grand Rapids, Michigan where we manufacture our weathervanes. Our office, manufacturing and shipping are located in one facility.

We proudly make our weathervanes in the U.S.A.

About Our Weather Vanes

Our weathervanes are made of 14 gauge steel and come with a one year warranty on the finish and a lifetime warranty on all workmanship. We use a 3 step finishing process- First we zinc plate our units for better adhesion and durability, then we bake on an antique copper vein powder coat followed by a clear powder coat to protect against the UV rays. This provides a durable, scratch resistant finish. We use sealed ball bearings in our windcups to keep them spinning freely with even the slightest breeze. Our design tops are laser cut in one piece, minimizing welding and making them a unique addition to your home. Our tops are interchangeable and easy to change.

The dimensions listed under each description is the approximate width x height. All of the designs are on a 21" arrow, but the designs vary in height and width on the arrow. All measurements are taken at the widest and tallest part of each design.

We offer over 150 designs including licensed Collegiate designs!

The History Behind the Weather Vane

Weathervanes can be both decorative and functional. The earliest referenced weathervane appears to be the image of Triton from Ancient Roman times at approx. 50 B.C.

The Guinness Book of World Records has the largest weathervane recorded at 48 feet high in Jerez, Spain.

Weathervanes or "windvanes" were meant to be decorative as well as functional. Most have arrows or pointers to show the direction of the wind. Some also have anemometers to measure the speed of the wind.

Many people associate the word weathervane with roosters on the rooftops. Rooster weathervanes became popular after the use of cockerels upon the roofs of churches. This was mandated by a papal edict in 9th century A.D.

Bronze, copper and wrought iron were used to make earlier weathervanes.

Today, you will find many different types of weathervanes made with various materials. Earlier weathervanes were typically animal shapes, but today you can find any design on a weathervane!